Utah Department of Administrative Services

Division of Archives & Records Service

TUTSAGUBET MINING DISTRICT (UTAH). RECORDER

Agency History #3101

CREATION

Miners in Washington County organized the Tutsagubet Mining District on 2 June 1883 at the camp of the Mountain Chief Mine. In accordance with federal law (Statutes at Large, Treaties, and Proclamations, of the United States of America, vol. XVII, chap. 152) which authorized the democratic organization of local mining districts to regulate the mining operations and record mining claims, local miners elected a mining district recorder and established by-laws. They established boundaries for the district, which included ten square miles in the Beaver Dam area in the southwest corner of the county. This district includes the Apex Mine, which produced copper and was particularly active during the 1890s.

In 1897 the Utah Legislature enacted a mining law, which abolished the office of mining district recorder. County recorders of the respective counties assumed all the duties and responsibilities previously performed by mining district recorders (Laws of Utah, 1897, chapter 36, "Mining Claims.") All books previously kept by district recorders were deposited in the office of the county recorder. However, the records suggest that the Tutsagubet Mining District recorder functioned for only two years, after which the responsibility for recording mining activity in the district fell to the Washington County recorder.

FUNCTIONS

Utah law recognized mining district recorders as public officials, and deemed the records in their custody to be official public records, receivable in the courts of the Territory. Utah law also required that the mining rules and regulations established by each mining district should be recorded by the county recorder in the county where the mining district was located (Compiled Laws of Utah, 1876, Chapter 10). The Tutsagubet Mining District recorder was responsible to record all mining claims within the mining district. Tutsagubet District by-laws required him to visit the ground at each claim and ensure that the claim was distinctly marked before he recorded it.

ADMINISTRATION

The mining district recorder was elected from among the mining claim holders for a two year term.

ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY

The recorder appointed deputies as necessary to assist in carrying out his responsibilities, and he collected a fee for each recording. In 1897 the Utah Legislature enacted a mining law, which abolished the office of mining district recorder. County recorders of the respective counties assumed all the duties and responsibilities previously performed by mining district recorders (Laws of Utah, 1897, chapter 36, "Mining Claims.") All books previously kept by district recorders were deposited in the office of the county recorder. However, the records suggest that the Tutsagubet Mining District recorder functioned for only two years, after which the responsibility for recording mining activity in the district fell to the Washington County recorder.

DIRECTORS
W. B. Pace,1883-1885

COMPILED BY: Rosemary Cundiff, May 2001

SOURCES

Alder, Douglas D. and Karl E. Brooks. A History of Washington County, Utah State Historical Society, Washington County Commission, 1996.

Laws of Utah, 1879, Chapter 10, "Of Mines and Mining,"

Laws of Utah, 1897, Chapter 36, "Mining Claims."

Statutes at Large, Treaties, and Proclamations of the United States of America, vol. XVII, ch. 152. Published by the authority of Congress, Boston: Brown, Little and Company.

Tutsagubet Mining District (Utah). Mining records, Record Book A, Utah State Archives, (Series 23670).